Drag Is Not A Contact Sport latest 2023

You are searching about Drag Is Not A Contact Sport, today we will share with you article about Drag Is Not A Contact Sport was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Drag Is Not A Contact Sport is useful to you.

Appropriate Warm-Up

I’ve been a speed and performance specialist for over 13 years and I always feel like I get some weird looks every time I start a training session with my athletes. After witnessing remarkably weird gyrations and silly jumping patterns, curiosity is instantly heightened. The question is inevitably asked, “Why do you warm up the way you do?”

Since coaches and athletes have always been looking for better ways to train properly, we thought an obvious topic to cover would be what to do “before” training even begins. A suitable warm-up allows us to get the most out of the game or the training session itself. The warm-up method shown here is different from the traditional stationary stretching positions recognizable from the days of college gym class.

Many perform some kind of light running or calisthenics, followed by various static stretching positions, then attempt to perform at a very high intensity level.

Sounds pretty familiar, right? And you might be thinking, “Yeah, I got you, so what’s the problem?”

Well, the problem is multiple. These types of “warm-ups” do not effectively address other key elements of a proper warm-up.

As some of that isn’t too far off, we’ll be questioning and proposing the true function of a proper motorsports warm-up. Training, practice or game situations demand maximum speed, 100% effort. The warm-up must therefore adequately prepare the participants for maximum speed, 100% effort!

We need to implement a protocol in the most effective and efficient way possible. The most appropriate warm-up allows you to focus on what’s most important, which is to further develop the skills needed to excel in your sport (or position). Translation – spend time doing what you need to spend time doing! The goal would be to warm up well in 15 minutes or less.

Effective warm-ups should achieve the following goals:

1. Raise Core Temperature and Lengthen Muscles

2. Excite the nervous system and activate neuromuscular innervation

3. Educate the body with the fundamental mechanics of movement

Our warm-up protocol accomplishes so much that we tend to struggle to give it an accurate label. As is the current trend of many self-proclaimed performance gurus, it could be accurately described as “Dynamic Movement Calibration Activity Protocol-3” (or DyMCAP-cubed) or whatever sexy label you want to stick on it! The point is that it covers a wide range of important categories. As we define each element, please take a moment to review your own warm-up procedure and see if it meets each criteria.

The program

The first objective:

Raise core temperature by increasing heart rate and elongate musculature using the body’s natural principle of reciprocal inhibition and decrease risk of injury.

Discussion:

For a muscle to be lengthened (stretched) safely and effectively, it must be done in a warm environment. That doesn’t mean you have to be in Myrtle Beach in July to get there. This means that we must gradually increase our heart rate, promote healthy circulation and blood circulation, and thus raise the body’s core temperature. This mirrors the principle of “thawing” a frozen mound of ground beef before molding it into a few good-sized burger patties. The warmer our muscles are, the more flexible they become. This is crucial as it allows for acute flexibility gains which essentially reduce the potential for tight muscles, tendons and joint trauma. The body is then better prepared to meet the progressive demands of the training session to follow.

Another factor is what is called reciprocal inhibition. It is the technical term describing the coordinated action of the behavior of the muscles in relation to each other. When one (agonist) muscle contracts, the reciprocal or opposing (antagonist) muscle(s) automatically relax, facilitating a more dramatic stretching effect.

Put into practice:

Incorporate dynamic movement patterns of walking, turning, stepping, bending, jumping, and jogging to elevate core temperature and elongate musculature. As you do, concentrate and try to contract the opposite muscle you want to stretch. For example, contract your quadriceps and keep your toes pointed as you swing the leg in front of you. If done correctly, you will feel a big stretch in both your hamstrings and your calf.

Remember that sports are multidirectional and multiplanar activities, so the warm-up routine must meet these requirements. Improved balance, coordination, and overall athleticism is a beneficial by-product of performing challenging movement patterns.

The second objective:

Excite the nervous system to “sound the alarm” and neuromuscular activation of the appropriate muscle groups.

Discussion:

This is where we have traditionally done our athletes a disservice. When we subject our athletes to fixed or static stretching positions, a “calming effect” of the nervous system occurs. It is exactly the opposite effect that we want to obtain. For this reason, one of the best times to do long slow static stretches is just before bedtime. Since we don’t put on our “pajamas”, we prefer to excite the nervous system to become more alert, responsive and energetic.

Consider the lethargy of waking up late one morning and how it can take you about an hour to “kick in.” Static stretching before activity usually has the same effect. On the other hand, think of being awakened in the middle of the night by the sudden sound of a fire alarm! Instantly ready to flee or fight for your life! Dynamic movement patterns of low-level hopping, skipping, and jogging are akin to sounding the alarm.

To approach the concept of neuromuscular activation, the saying “use-it or lose-it” comes to mind. When certain muscles aren’t working properly, they actually inhibit movement patterns, range of motion, and the ability to produce force. Over time, the neuromuscular innervation is nearly inactive as other muscle groups compensate for the lack of activity. A muscle can only act if it receives an electrical impulse. This is how we define “activation” – to describe whether a muscle has received the proper electrical command to perform its function.

Therefore, we must regularly use movement patterns that will stimulate the target response, otherwise we will effectively “lose” some of the ability to “activate” it. For example, a properly conditioned and activated piriformis will undoubtedly reduce injury potential and improve performance. Stabilization of the whole body is essential. The piriformis, as one of the six (6) stabilizers of the hip, helps reduce the potential for injury because the lower back is no longer forced to compensate for the lack of shock absorption of the glutes. Piriform stability is extremely critical to performance in terms of energy flow through the kinetic chain. If there is a break in the chain (sometimes called an energy leak), crucial ground reaction forces are compromised and cannot be used as effectively.

Put into practice:

A piriformis exercise such as extended hip abduction drags is a simple activation-type exercise that can be easily incorporated into the warm-up routine. Lying hip drags are performed by lying on your back (on your back), keeping both legs straight, then sliding (maintaining contact with the floor) one leg to the side as far as possible, then into you relaxing to return to the starting position. Repeat 5-10 reps for each leg.

The third objective:

Educate and teach the body to “memorize” the fundamental mechanics of movement.

Discussion:

One area where we can have the greatest impact is in the education of proper motor skill mechanics. The importance of this lies in understanding that these fundamental motor skills are the foundation of all athletic movement. Mere repetition is not enough for skill acquisition or athleticism to improve. We must constantly move in an environment that reinforces correct and efficient movement patterns. The concept of “muscle memory” is real and can be very detrimental when bad mechanics are repeatedly reinforced. Essentially, this section reinforces the basic principles of correct biomechanical movement – ​​posture, body alignment, angles of propulsion, arm action, leg action, and foot strike.

Beyond generic jumps, jumps, jogs, etc., we have the opportunity to introduce specific technical movement skills. These are learned skills, just like any athlete would learn to throw a soccer ball, kick a soccer ball, hit a baseball, or ride a bicycle. In my opinion, the person who said “you can’t teach speed” must have been an amazing “natural athlete” who just hopped on a bike and sped down the road! Or, maybe he wasn’t a particularly gifted athlete after all and couldn’t catch a ball and chew gum at the same time.

Whatever the case, teaching an athlete how the body should function is a vital and necessary undertaking. No matter how advanced they are, every athlete can improve their skills, coordination and overall athleticism.

Put into practice:

Basic linear motion skills such as the “A” walk and jumps are needed to establish fundamental straight line speed. Steps and “A” jumps are performed by maintaining a straight body alignment (from ear to ankle), holding the stomach firmly inward (as if holding its breath), elbows swing at 90 degrees, raising the knees to waist height (90 degree flexion at the knee) and the foot up (90 degrees at the ankle) while moving – either slowly in a deliberate walking cadence, or with a controlled, quick downward foot strike in a jumping motion.

In conclusion, the ultimate goal of the warm-up routine should prepare the athlete well with the qualities in which the game is played. It must be implemented in a safe, appropriate and succinct manner. I invite you to review your own warm-up procedures to see if they meet the criteria for elevation (elongation), excitement (activation), and education.

Video about Drag Is Not A Contact Sport

You can see more content about Drag Is Not A Contact Sport on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Drag Is Not A Contact Sport

If you have any questions about Drag Is Not A Contact Sport, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Drag Is Not A Contact Sport was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Drag Is Not A Contact Sport helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Drag Is Not A Contact Sport

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 6417
Views: 2113179 1

Search keywords Drag Is Not A Contact Sport

Drag Is Not A Contact Sport
way Drag Is Not A Contact Sport
tutorial Drag Is Not A Contact Sport
Drag Is Not A Contact Sport free
#WarmUp

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Appropriate-Warm-Up&id=2107612

Related Posts

default-image-feature

Draft Day Sports College Football 2023 latest 2023

You are searching about Draft Day Sports College Football 2023, today we will share with you article about Draft Day Sports College Football 2023 was compiled and…

default-image-feature

Dolce And Gabbana The One Sport latest 2023

You are searching about Dolce And Gabbana The One Sport, today we will share with you article about Dolce And Gabbana The One Sport was compiled and…

default-image-feature

Dolce And Gabbana Sport The One latest 2023

You are searching about Dolce And Gabbana Sport The One, today we will share with you article about Dolce And Gabbana Sport The One was compiled and…

default-image-feature

Does Youtube Tv Have Root Sports latest 2023

You are searching about Does Youtube Tv Have Root Sports, today we will share with you article about Does Youtube Tv Have Root Sports was compiled and…

default-image-feature

Does Sports Clips Take Apple Pay latest 2023

You are searching about Does Sports Clips Take Apple Pay, today we will share with you article about Does Sports Clips Take Apple Pay was compiled and…

default-image-feature

Does Play It Again Sports Rip You Off latest 2023

You are searching about Does Play It Again Sports Rip You Off, today we will share with you article about Does Play It Again Sports Rip You…